What’s in a name?

Last week I had the pleasure of attending ICON Services Corporation’s security course: Celebrity & VIP Protection. Why? First off, here at Coast Executive Services we do more than just Nightclub Security Consulting. And second, anyone working in field of Security (or any other industry) should constantly strive to expand their knowledge base across all subjects.

On the first day of training, the course instructor (Elijah Shaw) asked a great question:

“How do you define yourself?”

In this particular case, he was talking about Executive Protection Specialists. And that got me thinking about how many in the field of Nightclub Security view and define themselves. For the most of the general public, anyone working in a security role in an entertainment venue is a “Bouncer”. And most individuals working in the field would consider themselves “Bouncers”.

Why?

Is “bouncer” the term people are most accustomed to? Is it the term they are most comfortable using? Or is it just what “bouncers” want to be called? I think that all off these are correct to a certain degree. I also believe that by using the term “bouncer”, we have a tendency to lock ourselves into the stereotype. You know: big, muscle-bound guys who like to be rude and get into fights. If you’ve taken any time to read this blog, you know that I go to great pains to refer to “bouncers” as Security Staffers.

I do this because it is important for us as Security Staffers to get out of the “bouncer” mentality. If you are a somewhat mature, semi-intelligent individual you realize that not only is getting into fights stupid from a self-preservation perspective, but it is also incredibly foolish in terms of litigation (getting sued). Second, I think it is equally important to try and change the way society as a whole views the profession of nightclub security. If people think of you as a bouncer, they will expect you to act as one. It is your job to show them the aspects of the job that they may not always see: customer service, cleaning, assisting with the over-intoxicated, etc.

We define ourselves to others by our titles. And others define us by the names they make up. So when people ask you what you do, what do you want your answer to be? Do you “provide night club security”? Are you a “guest relations specialist”? Do you work in “conflict management”?

Or are you just a bouncer?

Think about it.

Until next time…

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